Arsenal Technical High School
Indianapolis, Indiana
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1500 E Michigan St
Indianapolis, Indiana 46201


 

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Arsenal Technical High School Alumni

Ron Clark Class of 1964
Ron Clark
Class of 1964
John Baker Class of 1963
John Baker
Class of 1963
Lori Armour Class of 1983
Lori Armour
Class of 1983
April W. Class of 1998
April W.
Class of 1998
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Famous Alumni Yearbooks

Click on the Yearbooks below to view a copy Online at Classmates.com®. If you don't see your class's yearbook, check out our yearbook page.


1916 Arsenal Technical High School 716 Yearbook

1918 Arsenal Technical High School 716 Yearbook

1922 Arsenal Technical High School 716 Yearbook
Famous Alumni Famous Alumni
Madge Rutherford Minton Class of 1937

Madge Rutherford Minton, daughter of Tech zoology teacher E.V. Rutherford, flew transport planes with the WASP during World War II. As a Tech student, Madge led an " active life, belonging to I many clubs, and working on the Arsenal Cannon staff, becoming editor-in-chief. She was a member of the Tech Legion and received the Milo H. Stuart Award. Madge attended Indiana University, then transferred to Butler University, from which she graduated in 1941. While at Butler she completed the Civilian Pilot Training Program, ranking third in a class of men. When she applied to take a course in aerobatics and cross country flying, she was rejected on the basis of her gender. She did not let that deter her ambition to fly, but immediately wrote to Eleanor Roosevelt, expressing her concern that women would not be allowed to fly to support the war effort. Madge received a reply from the first lady that there was no regulation excluding women from this course. In January 1943, Madge received a letter instructing her to report to Sweetwater, Texas, for training as an air transport pilot. She had to cancel plans for an April marriage to Sherman Minton, then serving as a doctor for the U.S. Navy in San Diego. Flight training proved to be rigorous and intensive. Upon graduation from the training program, Madge flew new planes from the factories where they were manufactured to the bases where they were needed. She requested to be based in Long Beach, California, to be near her fiancé in San Diego. They were married in October 1943. Her flying career came to a halt in 1944 when she discovered she was pregnant with the first of three daughters. Madge and Sherman Minton have traveled extensively, and lived in Pakistan for several years, while he served with A.I.D. Together they have researched and co-authored Venomous Reptiles, Giant Reptiles and Poisonous Insects. Madge has published a collection of her letters to her parents while serving in the WASP. She wrote articles for the 50th anniversary newsletter, and helped plan the 50th reunion of the women in training at Sweetwater, Texas, who served in World War II as , transport pilots. The Mintons currently live in Indianapolis, IN.

Jim Price Class of 1968

James E. Price (born November 27, 1949 in Russellville, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player. After starring at the University of Louisville, the 6' 3" Price was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers in the second round of the 1972 NBA Draft. Price would go on to play seven NBA seasons (1972-1979), spending time with the Lakers, Milwaukee Bucks, Buffalo Braves, Denver Nuggets, and Detroit Pistons. He was an All-Star in 1975, and he retired with 5,088 career points.He is currently the head coach of the Tampa Bay Strong Dogs in the American Basketball Association. Jim was a star player on the Tech basketball team.

Clyde F. McClain (Brigadier General) Class of 1939

Brigadier General Clyde F. McClain was born on March 25, 1921 in Ladoga, Indiana. He graduated from Arsenal Technical High School in 1939 and the University of Maryland in 1972. He attended Indiana University before entering the U.S. Army Air corps as a aviation cadet in January 1943. He graduated from flying school and was commissioned a second lieutenant in November 1943 at Brooks Field, Texas, then completed transition training at Barksdale Field, Louisiana. General McClain went to the European Theater of Operations in September 1944 and was assigned to the 322nd Bombardment Group. He flew combat missions from bases in England, France and Belgium. He returned to theUnited States in December 1945 and served as an operations staff officer with Headquarters Continental Air Forces at Bolling Field, Washington, DC, and later with Headquarters Strategic Air Command, at Andrews Field, Maryland. He was released from active military service in November 1947 and became a member of the Inactive Reserve. During the Korean War, General McClain was recalled to active duty in May 1951 and served with the 434th Troop Carrier Wing. In February 1952 he joined the Far East Air Forces in Japan, where he served as Chief of Flight Test and production inspection for the Far East Air Materiel Area at Tachikawa Air Base. He returned to the United States and went to the Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama in August 1955, where for the next three years he served as a member of the faculty of the Squadron Officer School. He became a student at the Air Command and Staff College in August 1958. In June 1959 General McClain was transferred to Aviano Air Base, Italy, as Director of Operations for the 7227th Support Group. In September 1962 he was assigned to the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing at Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina as a fighter squadron commander. He next served as Air Liaison Officer with the 4th Infantry Division at Fort Lewis, Washington from April 1964 to September 1966, then went to the Republic of Vietnam with the Division. In March 1967 he was transferred to Bien Hoa Air Base as Deputy Commander, 504th Tactical Air Support Group. He returned to the United States in October 1967 and was assigned to the Pacific Division of the Operations Directorate, Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In April 1969 he became a member of the United States/Vietnam delegation to the Paris Peace Talks. In July 1970 he returned to the Pentagon as Assistant to the Director for Operations for Joint Matters, Headquarters U.S. Air Force. He was reassigned in March 1972 to the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as Chief of the Pacific Division. In August 1973, General McClain assumed duties as Commander of the 313th Air Division with headquarters at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, and in December 1974 he was assigned additional duty as Commander, 18th Tactical Fighter Wing. General McClain became Vice Commander of Twelfth Air Force, Bergstrom Air Force Base, Texas in August 1975. His military decorations and awards include the Legion of Merit with one oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal with six oak leaf clusters, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Ribbon, and the Vietnam Cross for Gallantry with palm. General McClain is married to the former Marlys Stewart. They have three children: Rebecca, Robert and Sharon. His hometown is Indianapolis, Indiana. He was promoted to the grade of Brigadier General effective April 2, 1973, with date of rank March 26, 1973. by Sue Montgomery ('60)

Peter N Lupus Class of 1950

Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on June 17, 1932, Peter Lupus (who used the name Rock Stevens in his early film appearances prior to taking the role of Willy Armitage on TV's Mission: Impossible ) has had an on-again, off-again film career. For a number of years, Lupus has been a vitamin company representative and spokesman in the Hollywood Hills area, but he occasionally accepts small parts in films and TV shows. Before becoming an actor, Lupus had won the titles Mr. Indianapolis (1954), Mr. Indiana (1960), Mr. Hercules, and the world title of Mr. International Health Physique. As with many bodybuilders of the era, he tried his hand at acting and took roles in the Indianapolis Starlight Musicals series. In addition, he did summer stock work in the east. His first film role came in 1964's "Muscle Beach Party." But before the movie was released by American International Pictures, producer Samuel Z. Arkoff told Lupus to come up with a stage name, stating that American audiences liked American-sounding names. (I wonder why Arkoff didn't take his own advice?) In his first film, Peter Lupus (billed as Rock Stevens) portrays Flex Martian, the biggest and best bodybuilder in Jack Fanny's (Don Rickles) troupe of athletes. Look for Dan Haggerty (TV's Grizzly Adams) and famed bodybuilder Larry Scott as fellow bodybuilders. The movie also stars Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, John Ashley, Jody McCrea Others include beautiful Italian sexpot Luciana Paluzzi, Buddy Hackett, Morey Amsterdam, and Don Rickles. Muscle Beach Party is currently available on video. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on June 17, 1932, Peter Lupus (who used the name Rock Stevens in his early film appearances prior to taking the role of Willy Armitage on TV's Mission: Impossible ) has had an on-again, off-again film career. For a number of years, Lupus has been a vitamin company representative and spokesman in the Hollywood Hills area, but he occasionally accepts small parts in films and TV shows. Before becoming an actor, Lupus had won the titles Mr. Indianapolis (1954), Mr. Indiana (1960), Mr. Hercules, and the world title of Mr. International Health Physique. As with many bodybuilders of the era, he tried his hand at acting and took roles in the Indianapolis Starlight Musicals series. In addition, he did summer stock work in the east. His first film role came in 1964's "Muscle Beach Party." But before the movie was released by American International Pictures, producer Samuel Z. Arkoff told Lupus to come up with a stage name, stating that American audiences liked American-sounding names. (I wonder why Arkoff didn't take his own advice?) In his first film, Peter Lupus (billed as Rock Stevens) portrays Flex Martian, the biggest and best bodybuilder in Jack Fanny's (Don Rickles) troupe of athletes. Look for Dan Haggerty (TV's Grizzly Adams) and famed bodybuilder Larry Scott as fellow bodybuilders. The movie also stars Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, John Ashley, Jody McCrea Others include beautiful Italian sexpot Luciana Paluzzi, Buddy Hackett, Morey Amsterdam, and Don Rickles. Muscle Beach Party is currently available on video. During his tenure on "Mission: Impossible" Lupus was persuaded by his agent to keep his marriage to his wife, Sharon, a secret because, as Lupus stated, "I get such terrific fan mail." He met Sharon in the late 1950's when she visited the Indianapolis gym that Lupus owned. They were married in 1960 and are still together today, a rarity for Hollywood. FILM Carlo's Wake (1999) with Martin Landau Pumpkinhead II: Blood Wings (1994) with Peter Lupus III Love, Cheat & Steal (1993) Acting on Impulse (1993) The Nutt House (1992) Hangfire (1991) Think Big (1990) Assassination (1987) The Escapist (1983) Mission Impossible Versus the Mob (1968) Challenge of the Gladiator (1964) Hercules and the Tyrants of Babylon (1964) Giant of Evil Island (1964) Goliath at the Conquest of Damascus (1964) Muscle Beach Party (1964) TELEVISION Spy Game, episode Why Spy?, originally aired March 3, 1997 Police Squad! (1982) series regular Fantasy Island, episode One Million B.C., originally aired March 1, 1980 CHiPs, episode Roller Disco: Part 2, originally aired September 22, 1979 Vegas (1978?) (guest shot) Mission: Impossible (1966-1973) series regular I'm Dickens, He's Fenster (1963) (guest shot) The Jack Benny Show (1962?) (guest shot) (From the Las Vegas Review Journal, Tuesday, April 15, 1997)

Durward Kirby (1912-2000) Class of 1930

Durward Kirby, one of television's laid-back pioneers, became a household name in the 1950's and 1960's. During his Radio and TV broadcasting heyday in the '50s and '60s, he was the first sidekick for his longtime pal Garry Moore and foil to comedienne Carol Burnett on "The Garry Moore Show". He was later a co-host of "Candid Camera" with the late Alan Funt. Among his many credits, Kirby performed in the very first color television commercial aired on CBS. Mr. Kirby, who co-hosted "Candid Camera" with Alan Funt for five years, died March 15, 2000 in Fort Myers, Florida of congestive heart failure. He was 88. Kirby also played second banana on and off for years on "The Garry Moore Show." Kirby's association with Moore last for 30 years. Kirby's life began in Covington, Kentucky, and he was pursuing a degree in aeronautical engineering at Purdue University when fate intervened. He was walking by the campus radio station and was asked to fill in as an announcer. From there, he went on to work at radio stations in Chicago, Cincinnati and Indianapolis. His radio days were interrupted by World War II but afterward, the 6-foot-4 Kirby traveled to New York and began his long television career. With Moore's early live show, which ran from 1950-1951, Kirby served as an announcer and performer. He also performed on a variety show bearing Moore's name, which was shown on television from 1958-1964 and again from 1966-1967. Alan Funt created "Candid Camera" in 1961, although it had at one time been part of Moore's show, and Kirby co-hosted from the debut until 1966. He was known in the industry as a versatile performer and funnyman who could sing, dance and easily switch from slapstick comedy to salesman for the sponsor's product. He also was an author, penning "My Life, Those Wonderful Years;" "Bits and Pieces of This and That;" and "Dooley Wilson," a children's tome. Entertainer Arthur Godfrey once said Kirby was the only person in show business with whom everyone could get along. Kirby's popularity was such that a cartoon show, "Rocky and Bullwinkle" initiated a search for "Kirward Derby," a magic hat that would make its wearer the smartest man in the world. Kirby is survived by sons, Randall of Studio City, California; and Dennis of Ossining, New York; and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Paxton. He had moved to Sanibel, Fla. from Sherman in 1974 and later moved to Fort Meyers.

Joseph Hayes (a.k.a. Joseph H Arnold) Class of 1937

Joseph Arnold Hayes, who has also written under the pseudonym Joseph H. Arnold, was born on Aug. 2, 1918, in Indianapolis, Ind. He is the son of Harold Joseph and Pearl M. Arnold Hayes. He married Marrijane Johnston in 1938 and they had three children: Gregory, Jason, and Daniel. He studied at Indiana University, 1938-41, and is a full-time professional playwright and novelist. Occasionally he produces Broadway plays as partner in Erskine and Hayes Productions. Hayes received the Charles H. Sergel Drama Prize awarded by the University of Chicago in 1948. He won the Indiana authors Day Award in fiction for The Desperate Hours, 1955; the Antoinette Perry (Tony) Award of American Theatre Wing as author and co-producer of the play, “The Desperate Hours,” 1956; and the Edgar Allen Poe (Edgar) Award of Mystery Writers of America for the best mystery screenplay, “The Desperate Hours,” 1965. Information from Contemporary Authors

Robert E Clark Indiana Class of 1946

Robert later adopted the professional name of Robert Indiana, becoming famous throughout the world for his art works. Born in 1928 at New Castle, Indiana, as Robert Clark, between 1945 and 1948 he studied at art schools in Indianapolis and Utica, NY, from 1949 to 1953 at the Chicago Art Institute School and the Skowhgan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine. In 1953 and 1954 he studied at the Edinburgh College of Art and London University, after which he settled in New York where he took up contact with the painters Kelly, Smith and Youngerman. His early works were inspired by traffic signs, automatic amusement machines, commercial stencils and old trade names. In the early sixties he did sculpture assemblages and developed his style of vivid color surfaces, involving letters, words and numbers. In 1966 he had exhibitions in Düsseldorf, Eindhoven (Van Abbemuseum), Krefeld (Museum Haus Lange) and Stuttgart (Württembergische Kunstverein). He was represented at the Documenta "4" Exhibition, Kassel, in 1968. He became known for silkscreen prints, posters and sculptures which took the word LOVE as their theme. The brash directness of these works stemmed from their symmetrical arrangements of color and form. "By nature I am a keeper. I just don’t discard things. In a sense my art is really a reflection of that. There’s nothing virtuosic about my way of painting. Virtuosity seems to me to be the other side of serenity. I always thought of my work as being celebratory." Robert Indiana * Recent Exhibitions: Virginia Lust Gallery, New York; Lorenzelli Arte, Milan; National Museum of American Art, Washington DC; William A. Farnsworth Library and Art Museum, Rockland, Maine; Multiples, New York; Indianapolis Museum of Art; Newberger Museum, Purchase, New York; University Art Museum, University of Texas at Austin; Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia; Santa Fe Museum of Fine Arts, New Mexico; Galerie Denise René, New York; GalerieIm Haus Behr, Hindenburgbau, Stuttgart; Galerie De Gestlo, Bremen; Overbeck Gesellschaft, Lubeck; Galerie Christoph Durr, Munich; Galerie Droscher-Furneisen, Hamburg; Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruge; Amerika Haus, Berlin; Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire; Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine; Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts; Creighton University, Omaha; Saint Mary’s College, Notre Dame, Indiana; Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine; Institute of Contemporary Art of the University of Pennsylvania. Public Collections: Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam, The Netherlands; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Detroit Institute of Art, Michigan; Allentown Museum of Art, Pennsylvania; Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Brandeis Museum, Waltham, Massachusetts; Albright-Knox Gallery of Art, Buffalo, New York; Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, Delaware; Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Kaiser Wilhelm Museum, Krefeld, Germany; Los Angeles County Museum, California; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California. * from Robert Indiana, 13, 173, 207, Harry N. Abrams, 1990. For more visit: http://www.athsalumni.org/Robertindiana.htm

Benjamin Briscoe Class of 1939

Born to Benjamin E. Briscoe, Sr. and Ruth (Hollingsworth) Briscoe, in the South Brookside Park area of Indianapolis, he attended Public School #54 and Arsenal Technical High School graduating in June, 1939. He attended Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana from 1940-'42 when he was called by the military draft and served in World War II. Ben married Wilma Bussey in 1944. She also attended Indiana University Bloomington, but was from Marysville, Indiana where her father, Perry Bussey, owned Marysville Hardware store. Ben and Wilma moved to Southern California soon after they were married. Ben received his B.S. degree in Education from the University of Southern California in 1950 and moved to Avenal, CA , a Standard Oil town, where Wilma worked in a field office for that company and Ben taught school for thirty years. While teaching he was also working weekends in dance bands and on a cattle ranch in the local area. During summer vacations from 1952-'58 Ben worked as a Park Ranger in Yosemite National Park. In 1959 he received his M.A. degree in Science Education from California State University at San Jose, CA. Ben retired from teaching in 1977 and went into the real estate business. He was also involved in a commercial aviation business which he owned and flew air taxi for hire for several years. He also retired as a search and rescue pilot after twelve years service with the Civil Air Patrol. Today Ben works with a university, teaching graduate students who are in the process of qualifying for a California Teaching Credential, and he also plays in the Fresno Shrine Band for recreation. See below for a list of just a few of Ben's lifetime achievements. Life member of CTA and NEA and holder of several offices Ted Bass Memorial "Teacher in Politics" Award -- 1972 Life Member Phi Delta Kappa Honorary Fraternity in Education Central Valley California Mensa International Letter of Congratulations from Governor Gray Davis for his long years of service in California Schools Life credentials in Elementary and Secondary Education as well as credentials in Administration and a Master of Arts degree in Science Education Sigma Pi Collegiate Fraternity Masonic Lodge -- 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Order of Sciots in Arizona and California B.P.O. Elks Tehran Temple Shrine - Fresno Kings County Democratic Central Committee Board of Directors -- California Agricultural Dist. Fair Governor's Advisory Committee on Aeronautical Education Committee to acquire a Mental Health Clinic for Kings County Boy and Girl Scout drives for funds and troop committeeman Red Cross First Aid Instructor Many different capacities in P.T.A. organizations Professional musician in dance bands, marching bands and small combos Ranger, Yosemite National Park Commercial Pilot and much more . . . Ben Briscoe, 86, died Dec. 24 in Avenal. Mr. Briscoe was an elementary school teacher for almost 30 years and a real estate agent for 11 years. He also was active in the Shriners, Elks, and Masons and was the recipient of the Hiram Award from the Masons for his volunteer work on college scholarships. Mr. Briscoe is survived by his wife of 63 years, Wilma; and son, Alan and his wife, Laurel, and their grandson, Jordan. Interment was held Dec. 28 at Belmont Memorial Park in Fresno. A memorial service will be held on a date to be announced in January. http://www.legacy.com/HanfordSentinel/GB/GuestbookView.aspx?PersonId=100469396

Howard Aiken Class of 1925

Howard Hathaway Aiken (March 8, 1900 – March 14, 1973) was a pioneer in computing, being the original conceptual designer behind IBM's Harvard Mark I computer. ATHS Class of January 1919

Howard Aiken Class of 1925

[Actually graduated in 1918 but the Grad Year drop-down only goes to 1925] A father of the modern-day computer - On March 8, 1900, Howard Aiken was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, although he was raised in Indianapolis, Indiana. After the eighth grade, he began work as a switchboard operator while attending Arsenal Technical High School during the day. Upon completion of high school in 1918, he attended University of Wisconsin and received his bachelor of science degree in 1923. He became a professor at the University of Miami, but in 1935, decided to obtain his Ph.D. He received his masters in physics from Harvard in 1937. However, it was Aiken's graduate work in 1936, improving the vacuum tube design (which required long hours of tedious mathematical calculations) that sparked his discovery. Aiken's need to complete the complex, non-linear mathematical problems lead him back in time to Charles Babbage and his Analytical Engine. Aiken saw part of Babbage's calculating machine in the attic of a physics lab at Harvard and was amazed. He would use Babbage's 100-year-old idea to serve as the foundation of Aiken's Mark I. Aiken's idea was to use "electromagnetic components controlled by coded sequences of instructions, and one that would operate automatically after a particular process had been developed". What he envisioned was a machine that would use electro-mechanical power to solve differential equations. Aiken was heavily criticized for using electro-mechanical power especially since he was doing frontier work with vacuum tubes, but it was inexpensive, and that was one of his needs at the time. To also save on cost and time, he wanted to build a machine that used parts that had already been invented. Supported by IBM, the results were astounding. His Mark I was a 51 foot wide by 2 feet deep machine with a 50 foot mechanical shaft and a 5 horse power electric motor. It contained 3/4 million parts and could store 72 numbers. It could do 3 addition or subtraction problems per second, one multiplication problems in six seconds, and logarithmic or trigonometric problems in one minute or more. It was slow, even by standards of the day, but it was the first machine to complete these tasks. Phenomenally, Mark I ran 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for 15 years and was free from errors for that entire time. Once Mark I was completed, Aiken was made an officer in charge of the U.S. Navy Computing Project. The U.S. Navy saw great potential for this computer machine, for quickly and accurately calculating gun trajectories. The Mark I was the "first fully automatic computer to come into operation" and paved the way for other calculating machines. It proved that "a complex calculating engine could function automatically, performing operations in sequence and following a predetermined program from the entry of data to the production of the final results". However, Aiken was not the only one pushing the boundaries of computing. Mauchly and Eckert were also working on their creation, the ENIAC. Mark I certainly lead to great things in the evolution of computers. Mark I was John von Neumann's first encounter with the personal computer. His work in the area of computer programming and combined with Freddy Williams's of advanced memory, would create an increasingly more powerful and complex computer. It took seven years and a lot of money to finally get the machine operational. Part of the delay was due to the intervention of World War II. Officially the computer was called the IBM Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator but most everyone called it the Mark I. After completing the Mark I, Aiken went on to produce three more computers, two of which were electric rather than electromechanical. More important than the actual computer (whose major purpose was to create tables), was the fact that it proved to the world that such a machine was more than just fancy, it was a practical purpose machine. Perhaps more important than the invention of Mark I was Aiken's contribution to academia. He started the first computer science academic program in the world. Aiken retired from teaching at Harvard in 1961 and moved to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. He died March 14, 1973 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Alumni Memorials Memorials

This section is to remember Arsenal Technical High alumni who have passed away.


Class of 1947 - Fred Loeffler
Class of 1956 - Howard Franke
Class of 1960 - Jerry W. Dunbar
Class of 1962 - Richard Allen
Class of 1962 - Connie Belcher Puckett
Class of 1962 - Virginia Bernhardt Terry
Class of 1962 - Walter N Burks
Class of 1962 - Joyce Carloss Graham
Class of 1962 - Betty A Cochran Thomas
Class of 1962 - Pamela C Comer Jackson
Class of 1962 - Cecil Nolan Cornelius
Class of 1962 - Donna Craig White
Class of 1962 - Kenneth Davis
Class of 1962 - Wayne Davis
Class of 1962 - John Deal
Class of 1962 - Claudie R Deckard
Class of 1962 - Claudius S Fielder
Class of 1962 - James Arthur Fowler
Class of 1962 - Robert Gannon
Class of 1962 - Bruce Ward Geddes
Class of 1962 - Vernon R Gooden
Class of 1962 - Charles "Chip" L Goodman
Class of 1962 - Janet E Gray Hampton
Class of 1962 - William T Griffey
Class of 1962 - Sandra "Sandy" M Hamilton
Class of 1962 - Sharon L Hayes Mabry
Class of 1962 - Thomas J Holtman
Class of 1962 - Scott H Hubbard, Jr.
Class of 1962 - Charles Lee Humphries
Class of 1962 - Clarice Ruth Jackson Parks
Class of 1962 - Charlene N Jones Grisell
Class of 1962 - Paul H Jones, Jr.
Class of 1962 - Patsy Sue Knight Heylmann
Class of 1962 - Terry A Lantis
Class of 1962 - Loretta M Leturgez Smith
Class of 1962 - Joann S Long
Class of 1962 - Donna D Looper
Class of 1962 - Ruth E Luke
Class of 1962 - Claudia J Lutes Hempfing
Class of 1962 - Robert "Gene" Marqua
Class of 1962 - Sherry B Mc Cain (Lee?)
Class of 1962 - Michael "Mike" M Mellene
Class of 1962 - Sandra S Mertz McCammack
Class of 1962 - Edith M Metzger
Class of 1962 - Jerry Earl Morgan
Class of 1962 - Kia Campbell Nogle
Class of 1962 - Robert R Pentecost
Class of 1962 - Charles W Piety
Class of 1962 - Phyllis A Plummer Arnett
Class of 1962 - Rita Jane Quillen Wesner
Class of 1962 - Judith Kay Reyman Jenkins
Class of 1962 - Norman C Roberts
Class of 1962 - James F Robinson
Class of 1962 - Dennis W Rosier
Class of 1962 - Luvernia Rouse
Class of 1962 - Brenda Darlene Scott White
Class of 1962 - Pearl Ann Sebo Neidlinger
Class of 1962 - Janet Elaine Short McMurray
Class of 1962 - Charles J Stacy
Class of 1962 - David E Stahlhut
Class of 1962 - Janet Marie Stewart McFarren
Class of 1962 - Terrence Tandy
Class of 1962 - Roe Ann Towe Rollins
Class of 1962 - Joyce L Tucker White
Class of 1962 - Carl A Williams
Class of 1962 - Thomas Williams
Class of 1962 - David L Williamson
Class of 1962 - Roger Wilson
Class of 1962 - David E Wischmeyer
Class of 1962 - Troy Wright Jr
Class of 1962 - Ronald G Wyatt
Class of 1962 - Glenda F Yates Ragsdale
Class of 1962 - Robert L Young
Class of 1962 - David R Yount
Class of 1970 - George O'Haver
Class of 1970 - George A. O'Haver
Class of 1970 - Russell Tracy
Class of 1971 - Samuel Price
Class of 1972 - Calvin Wood
Class of 1973 - Loraine Walter
Class of 1978 - Sonja Moore
Class of 1981 - Michelle Hunt-brown
Class of 1985 - Thomas Johnson
Class of 1991 - Nyree Parnell
Class of 1998 - Melanie Highsaw
Class of 2004 - Julius Lorick
More...
Alumni Listings Latest Alumni Listings
Floyd Clements Class of 1976
Richard Merrick Class of 1944
Kimberly Bates Class of 1992
Patricia Pedro
Pearl Brown
Rosemary Gilpin Class of 1934
Donna Cline Class of 1978
Donald Horn
Debbie Weber Class of 1977
Kenneth Hammond
Kenny Hammond
Janet Lester Class of 1950
Antoinette Sanders Class of 2009
Nika Grey Class of 1996
Slone James Class of 1965
Lashowna Perkins Class of 1993
Latonya Crawford Class of 1992
Anastacio Morales Jr Class of 1988
Tracey Johnson Class of 1993
Sheryl Huber Class of 1995
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This site has been created for the former students of Arsenal Technical High located in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can share memories of those activities that you were involved with at Arsenal Technical HS and you can view other alumni and read what other former students have posted about the time they spent at Arsenal Technical. Arsenal Technical High School alumni can relive their experiences from high school by sharing memories and pictures, reconnecting with those alumni listed, searching for former students and more.

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